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February / march 2017


Winter Chills... Higher Bills

This fall and winter we’ve already seen several rounds of chilly Arctic air. Colder temperatures lead to higher energy bills in the Pacific Northwest. Typical January bills can be double or more compared to July bills. The PUD can help keep your bills in check. We recommend setting your heat at 55 degrees when you’re asleep or away and 68 degrees when you’re home and awake. We also offer a range of programs to help customers save energy, including instant rebates for home weatherization and efficient heat pumps plus discounts on energy-saving lights. Check out all our conservation programs and more energy conservation tips at our website.


Storm Safety – Be Ready!

Get a jump on this season’s storms by doing a few things now before the next storm blows in!

  • Create an emergency kit with a three- to five-day supply of water, food, flashlights, batteries, first-aid supplies and other essential items.
  • Have a backup plan. Consider a portable generator if you have special medical needs.
  • Practice your plan. Make sure everyone knows what to do and how to contact each other.
  • Stay away from fallen power lines. Report them to the PUD at 425-783-1001.
  • Never use a gas stove or charcoal grill inside. Carbon monoxide poisoning can be deadly.
  • Stay informed. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter. Listen to updates on local news radio stations.



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Energy Challenge Tip:
Control Your Thermostat to Save Energy & Money

Winter’s cold days and nights can mean high energy bills, especially for those who live in homes heated primarily with electric baseboard or wall heaters. Since baseboard/wall heaters supply heat to each room individually, they’re ideally suited for zone heating. Turn down the thermostat in unused rooms and close the door. Zone heating can produce energy savings of more than 20%! Get more tips!


Now That's Bright!

In honor of Thomas Edison, who perfected the first commercially practical incandescent light bulb in 1879, the “World’s Largest Light Bulb” sits atop the 134-foot-tall Thomas Edison Memorial Tower in Edison, New Jersey. The bulb is 14 feet tall and weighs eight tons. Since the tower’s opening in 1938, the bulb had owed its glow to incandescent bulbs. This changed in 2015, when the monument was given an LED makeover.